To, Too, or Two?

These homophones are tricky because there are three of them, they all sound the same, but they have highly different meanings. There is one simply trick that will help you distinguish the difference between them–one trick will help you sort out all three homophones. to–Preposition; shows direction or relation to another object John walked to…

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Weather vs Whether

These two homophones are tricky buggers for many of us. Why? Because they sound the same, and they look awfully close in spelling. Here’s how to remember the difference between the two. Weather; N. –the condition of the atmosphere or climate The weather outside is frightful. Weather; V.–the act of wearing down by erosion The horse saddle…

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The Slippery Apostrophe

This small, nearly imperceptible punctuation mark is the cause of much frustration and guesswork in the English language. I will share simple, easy-to-remember tips and tricks to help you remember and know where to use an apostrophe correctly every time. Don’t ever guess again! There are two reasons to use an apostrophe: to show contraction–combine two words…

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Affect vs. Effect

Affect vs. Effect Ah, what a troublesome pair! The reason these words cause so many people so much confusion is that they are homophones–words that sound the same but have different meanings. When listening casually to a speaker, it’s difficult to tell the difference, and most of us can bluff our way through the speaking…

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Commas, Quotation Marks, and Periods

Commas and Periods Always Go Inside… Commas and periods ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS go inside the closing quotation mark in standard American English. Period. 1) I really like the word “cheese.” 2) He said, “I really like cheddar cheese.” 3) “I do like cheese,” said the mouse, “when it’s not baiting a trap.” In every case,…

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